Why We Love the Church: In Praise of Institutions and Organized Religion

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Reward Yourself

Kevin DeYoung and Ted Kluck, shrewd observers and faithful practitioners, have once again written a book that is like the best of foods good tasting and good for you. Their style is easy, creative, and funny. They are theologically faithful, fresh, and insightful. They are sympathetic with many concerns and even objections to much in the church today, yet are finally defensive, in the best sense of the word. They are careful critics of the too-popular critics of the church. They are lovers of Christ and His church. In spite of her obvious flaws, DeYoung and Kluck really do love the church, because they love the Christ whose body it is.

This is a great read and I recommend it with unbridled enthusiasm. Jesus loves the church. Yes, the church is imperfect, and we have made mistakes. But if we love Jesus, then we will love what Jesus loves. This book moves us to a thrilling portrait and future of what the church that Jesus loves and builds can look like and the hope we can bring to the world. As a result, many people fail to make a solid commitment to congregational life and responsibility. The New Testament is clear to love Christ is to love the church.

Kevin and Ted provide a powerful word of correction, offering compelling arguments and a vision of church life that is not only convincing, but inspirational. This book will deepen your love of the church and for Christ. Example fallback content : This browser does not support PDFs. Please use a different, updated web browser to use wtsbooks. What Is a Reformed Church? Add to Wishlist. Average rating 4. Rating details. More filters.


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Sort order. Aug 04, Mark Sequeira added it. It's a flop. And a bad one at that. The authors appear to have never read any of the books by Frank Viola or Neil Cole or Barna, among others. Their critique of those writers who I confess, I largely agree with comes down to, "I have issues with the church, too! They never address the fine and numerous points made by those men.

One has to wonder if that is because they cannot?! This is one of those books I was not only highlighting but also writing in the columns of, which I haven't done since maybe Brian McLaren's Generous Orthodoxy. And I also confess to being 'reformed' like the authors. There is no excuse for such a poorly researched or written book. Shame on the authors for pitching this out there either as a cheap appeal to believers to keep sponsoring older institutions that need to be re-evaluated in light of the gospel, or to make money off another title in a series. Claptrap in other words.

And I'm trying my hardest to be gracious.

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Apologize and rewrite a serious response to those who have braved the wrath of the church in faithfulness to the Scriptures and Scripture's God. Feb 05, Erin rated it it was ok Shelves: religiousity. Kevin and Ted invest a good third of the book coming across as defensive and cocky, attacking other authors that simply shed light on issues we should be openly discussing as the church.

I believe what Kevin and Ted fail to truly understand is that there has been an increase in books that discuss gray cultural spiritual issues because Christians have gotten the reputation for being very black and white. I agree that the gospel is a black and white issue, but relationships with people are not. Th Kevin and Ted invest a good third of the book coming across as defensive and cocky, attacking other authors that simply shed light on issues we should be openly discussing as the church.

Book Review: Why We Love The Church

They are built on a willingness to listen and understand where someone is coming from. I think the books they criticize simply aim to create a more empathic conversation with people who've previously felt shut out. I don't see them as making light of or twisting the gospel, but it seems Kevin and Ted perceive it that way.

Disagreements aside, it was the tone and attitude of the writing that led me to a lower rating. I would still encourage people to read it as they shape their own perspective-- many great points made about the beauty of the church at its best and the true biblical gospel.

Jan 07, David rated it really liked it. If you are a believer but have written off church as meaningless and ineffective, you should read this book. In spite of many onslaughts by some evangelical writers, these authors champion the "traditional" bible-believing church.

The authors acknowledge the church's weaknesses and its many faults. Yet they choose to focus on oft overlooked strengths and character. They say "Daily discipleship is not a new revolution each morning or an agent of global transformation every evening; its a long obe If you are a believer but have written off church as meaningless and ineffective, you should read this book.

They say "Daily discipleship is not a new revolution each morning or an agent of global transformation every evening; its a long obedience in the same direction," p. Well researched and well written. Witty and thought provoking. Take up and read! Dec 09, L-T Hopper added it Shelves: church.

Justin Bieber on Religion

Very timely book to read as I start another year of being the pastor of a local church. Aug 02, Paul rated it it was amazing Shelves: apologetics , the-kirk , church-history , emergent-church. If I were more strict, the book was probably four stars, but I gave it five anyway. If you tried to justify your dislike of his wife by pointing out that she has warts and is ugly, could you possibly expect a punch in the nose, if not a kick to the cojones?

Well, if you're a Christian and you treat th If I were more strict, the book was probably four stars, but I gave it five anyway. Well, if you're a Christian and you treat the church with similar derision, how is this scenario any different than what you do to the bride of Christ?


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  • Recently, in the best popular-level Christian book of so I say , Michael Horton wrote of a Christless Christianity. The book is mainly a critique of the arguments for why the church is "uncool," or why it needs to be redone meet at Starbucks with some Christian friends and discuss the "spirituality" of The Matrix. Thus, the title is a little deceptive in that the book is not so much a positive argument for why the authors love the church, though that is definitely included, but I guess even the negative functions as positively as that kick to the cajones would in relaying how much your friend loved his wife whom you mocked.

    In that movie B-rabbit owned up to all his faults and thus took the steam right out of Papa Doc's attempt to cut B-rabbit down. They own up to many of the various critiques the "church sucks" crowd and the "redo church according to a Starbucks model" crowd have offered.

    They also point out that many of the criticisms are quite over exaggerated. And they also argue that the answer isn't to leave the church. But they also offer correctives to some of the over exaggerated criticisms, or, if called for, outright refutations. In doing so they set forth what I would call a biblically-informed view of the church that Jesus established.

    They also call for the "church critics" to inspect their own hearts. A lot of church-loathing stems, and I would say this is right given my experiences on both ends, from a lot of self-righteousness. Yeah, the church has problems, but so do you. The answer isn't to ditch it or deconstruct it. The church isn't supposed to be hip, edgy, cool, relevant, or even sexy, if we measure what counts as those things according to culture. That unbelievers don't like the church doesn't necessarily mean the church has the problem. Why would an unconverted soul particularly like preaching done right?

    Sure, they wouldn't mind "a conversation" with a "conversation facilitator" where there is no dogma proclaimed and no call to repentance.

    Review - Why We Love the Church

    The church isn't culture. It isn't part of what is fading and passing away. Of what is temporary. It is where the Lord meets his people and feeds them by word and sacrament. Where what Jesus did on behalf of his people is proclaimed and tired sinners are called to trust and rest in what Christ has done for them. These truths are dogmatically proclaimed by the herald of the king.

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    In the city of man things are quite different. Church is the weekly rest stop for pilgrims passing through a land in which they are foreigners. They are feed and replenished by hearing of what was accomplished on their behalf so that their working could cease. Along with the preaching of the Word and delivery of the Sacraments, discipline is also a vital function of the church ala 1.